Lakeland Community College
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Department of Biology

 Biology Faculty

 Jamie Landis
     Department Chair

 Andie Musial

 Justin Nussbaum

 Justin Rosemier

 Don Rubbelke
     Biological Imaging
     Nature Hunt

 Steve Vieira

 Susan Wadkowski

 Department
 Information

 Mission

 Goals

 Courses
     Non-Majors
     Biology Majors
     Health Tech Majors

 Madison Campus
     BIOL 1170
     BIOL 1200

 Holden Center*
     BIOL 1510
     BIOL 2210
     BIOL 2220

 Full Time Faculty

 Part-Time Faculty

Biology Department Mission

The mission of the Biology Department at Lakeland Community College is to expand our students’ knowledge of the biological sciences through engaging lecture and laboratory study, and hands-on exploration. We strive to not only prepare our diverse student population for their career choices, but also help them make informed decisions as members of our community. Our students will come to appreciate the varied methods of inquiry used to understand biological systems, and expand their perspectives on biological issues through the development of critical thinking. Upon successful completion of coursework in our Department, students will be intellectually enriched in the discipline, and also cultivate an appreciation regarding how this insight can serve as a foundation for a more comprehensive and informed worldview.



Biology Department Goals

The Biology Department seeks to develop students’ knowledge of the biological sciences and provide them with information which will prepare them for their career choices and which will help them make informed decisions in their everyday lives. To accomplish this the Biology Department:

1.  Offers individual courses and course sequences for electives or to fulfill the science requirements for either an Associate of Arts (AA) or Associate of Science (AS) degree as outlined in the Lakeland Transfer Module.

2.  Offers courses which are part of the Bioscience Technology Program and the Health Technologies Programs including Dental Hygiene, Health Information Management Technology, Histotechnology, Medical Laboratory Technology, Medical Assisting, Multi-Skilled Health Technology, Nursing, Phlebotomy, Radiologic Technology, Respiratory Therapy, and Surgical Technology.

3.  Works with the Counseling Department to help direct students in planning their curriculum, in selecting and working with transfer institutions, and other academic matters on request.

4.  Works with the Career Services Department to inform students of employment opportunities and career choices related to the biological sciences.

5.  Works with the Learning Center to provide tutorial services.


 Division Information

 Dean’s Office

Biology Courses

 Courses for Non-Majors

BIOL 1010 Introductory Biology I: Cells, Genetics and Evolution (non-lab) (AA) (TM)
This course is offered on Main Campus and Online.
3 contact hours (outline)
This course introduces basic chemical and cellular levels of life, provides an overview of genetics and evolution, and describes the major taxonomic categories of living organisms.  Major topics include basic inorganic chemistry, biochemistry, cell structure and function, energy flow through cells, Mendelian genetics, DNA and proteins, and evolution.  This is a non-lab course intended for non-science majors.

BIOL 1020 Introductory Biology II: Organismic Biology & Ecology (non-lab) (AA) (TM)
This course is offered on Main Campus and Online.
3 contact hours (outline)
This course provides an introduction to the organismic biology of plants and animals, basic ecology, and the effects of human disturbance on the Earth’s life support systems.  Major topics include plant and animal structure and function, population and community ecology, and environmental impacts.  This is a non-lab course intended for non-science majors.

BIOL 1030 Environmental Issues (non-lab)
This course is offered on Main Campus and Online.
3 contact hours (outline)
This course examines the major environmental issues facing the world including pollution, population growth, soil erosion, destruction of forests and other natural areas, climate changes and other environmental impacts induced by human activity.  It introduces a wide spectrum of viewpoints on what constitutes an environmental problem, as well as the controversies about appropriate remedial measures.  The course analyzes problems and emphasizes the successful search for solutions.  It develops a number of themes across a broad range of environmental issues including sustainability, the global economy, the global environment, short-term versus long-term gains, and the trade-off involved in balancing environmental problems and solutions.  This non-laboratory course is intended for non-science majors.  Because of similarities in content, students who have taken BIOL 1170 Ecology and Environmental Biology should not take this course.

BIOL 1140 Human Biology (non-lab) (AA) (AS-E) (TM)
This course is offered on Main Campus and Online.
3 contact hours (outline)
This course introduces the fundamentals of human structure and function at the chemical, cellular, tissue, organ, and system levels.  Specific topics include the chemistry of life, cell structure and function, patterns of inheritance and human genetics, and the structure and functions of the body systems.  The course includes the study of homeostasis, tissues, and the integumentary, muscular, nervous, endocrine, cardiovascular, respiratory, immune, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems.  This is a non-lab course intended for non-science majors.

BIOL 1150 Plant Biology (with lab) (AA) (AS-E) (TM)
This course is offered on Main Campus.
6 contact hours: 3 lecture, 3 lab (outline)
This course provides basic foundations in organismic biology related to plants.  It includes the cellular basis of plants, a study of plant cells and tissues, their structure and function, and basic energy relationships of cells.  Additionally, the course emphasizes structure, function, taxonomy, ecology, and importance of plants to humans.  Lab activities focus on experimental greenhouse studies, observations of plant morphology, and identification of local plant species.  This course is intended for non-science majors.

BIOL 1160 Animal Biology (with lab) (AA) (AS-E) (TM)
This course is offered on Main Campus.
6 contact hours: 3 lecture, 3 lab (outline)
This course provides an introduction to organismic biology related to animals.  It includes animal cell structure and function, biodiversity and evolution of the animal kingdom, and homeostasis and the organization of the animal body.  Additional specific topics include animal tissues; skeletal, muscular, digestive, respiratory, nervous, excretory, and reproductive organs and systems; nutrition and energy flow; importance of animals to humans; inheritance; and behavior.  This course includes both lecture and laboratory components and is intended for non-science majors.

BIOL 1170 Ecology and Environmental Biology (with lab) (AA) (AS-E) (TM)
This course is offered on Main Campus and at Lakeland East in Madison.
6 contact hours: 3 lecture, 3 lab (outline)
This course provides a framework for understanding basic ecology and environmental science.  It gives an introduction and overview of ecological concepts at the population, community, ecosystem, and biosphere levels.  Students will examine environmental impacts and solutions in the areas of air, water, and soil pollution; human population growth; energy use and alternatives; and biodiversity and conservation.  The course has both a lecture and laboratory component and is intended for non-science majors.  Because of similarities in course content, students who have taken BIOL 1030 Environmental Issues and Solutions should not take this course.

BIOL 1190 Introduction to Evolutionary Biology (with lab) (AA) (AS-E) (TM)
This course is offered on Main Campus.
6 contact hours: 3 lecture, 3 lab (outline)
Prerequisite: high school biology or higher.  This course provides a framework for understanding the concepts of evolutionary biology.  It offers an overview of the subject by focusing on the underlying mechanisms that drive change in biological form and function through natural selection.  Students will explore the role of ecology, genetics, and development as modulators of change.  Special topics will include origins of life, plant and animal evolution, human evolution, evolution of sex, social and behavioral evolution, and infectious disease, as well as alternative views on origins and the socio-political consequences of this theory.  This is an elective biology course intended for both science and non-science major students pursuing degrees in biology, healthcare behavior, or education.

 Courses for Biology Majors

BIOL 1510 Principles of Biology I (with lab) (AA) (AS) (AS-E) (TM)
This course is offered on Main Campus and
in our new state-of-the-art labs in the Holden University Center*
6 contact hours: 3 lecture, 3 lab (outline)
This course introduces students to the organization of living systems, energy transfer, continuity of life, biodiversity, and classification of living things.  The topics include biological history, structure and functions of cells and cellular organelles, cell division, general biochemistry, cellular respiration, photosynthesis, DNA structure and function, protein synthesis, heredity, evolution, animal development, and classification.  It also introduces viruses, prokaryotes, Protista, and Fungi.  This course has both a lecture and laboratory component.  It provides the prerequisite for BIOL 1520 Principles of Biology II and other advanced courses in biology.  This course and BIOL 1520 provide a general introduction to the biological sciences for the science major.

BIOL 1520 Principles of Biology II (with lab) (AA) (AS) (AS-E) (TM)
This course is offered on Main Campus.
6 contact hours: 3 lecture, 3 lab (outline)
Prerequisite: BIOL 1510 or equivalent.  This course builds on the concepts introduced in BIOL 1510 Principles of Biology I.  It provides an overview of the structural and functional characteristics of animals and plants and the basic concepts of ecology.  This course introduces the major animal and plant phyla and examines their taxonomic, evolutionary, and organizational relationships, and their life cycles.  Additional topics include animal tissues, organs, and organ systems; the structure and function of vascular plants; and ecology.  This course has both a lecture and laboratory component.  This course and BIOL 1510 provide a general introduction to the biological sciences for the science major.

  Courses for Health Technologies Majors

BIOL 1200 Fundamentals of Biology for the Health Technologies (with lab) (TM)
This course is offered on Main Campus and at Lakeland East in Madison.
6 contact hours: 3 lecture, 3 lab (outline)
This course provides an introduction to the concepts and principles of biology for students interested in entering the health technologies programs.  Major topic areas include biological chemistry, cellular structure and function, and the basic energy relationships of cells.  Additionally, this course includes cell division, molecular biology, genetics and heredity, and early embryologic development.  This course has both a lecture and laboratory component.

Biol 1200 is a prerequisite for Biol 2210/2220 and Biol 2700:
The content covered in Biol 1200 is prerequisite material for the Anatomy and Physiology series (Biol 2210/2220) as well as for Microbiology (Biol 2700).  If you have taken an introductory Cell Biology course at another college or university or if you had a higher level high school Biology course, you may be eligible to register directly for Biol 2210 (Anatomy and Physiology I).  The course outline for Biol 1200 details the material covered.  To discuss your Cell Biology background or to test out of Biol 1200, contact Susan Wadkowski.

BIOL 2210 Anatomy and Physiology I (with lab) (AA) (AS) (AS-E) (TM)
This course is offered on Main Campus and
in our new state-of-the-art labs in the Holden University Center*
6 contact hours: 3 lecture, 3 lab (outline)
Prerequisite: high school chemistry or CHEM 1100, high school biology in the last five years; or BIOL 1200. This course introduces the organization of the human body in the context of the unifying concepts of feedback regulation and homeostasis.  The course assumes a general knowledge of cell structure and function and begins with a study of tissues and a general introduction to organs and systems.  It then provides detailed study of the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems.  This course has both a lecture and laboratory component.  This course and BIOL 2220 Anatomy and Physiology II provide students with a general introduction to the biology of the human body.  All students are strongly encouraged to take BIOL 1200 Fundamentals of Biology for the Health Technologies or BIOL 1510 Principles of Biology I prior to taking this course.

BIOL 2220 Anatomy and Physiology II (with lab) (AA) (AS) (AS-E) (TM)
This course is offered on Main Campus and
in our new state-of-the-art labs in the Holden University Center*
6 contact hours: 3 lecture, 3 lab (outline)
Prerequisite: BIOL 2210. This course continues the study of the human body begun in BIOL 2210 Anatomy and Physiology I.  The course examines the relationships between endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, reproductive and urinary body systems along with the regulatory mechanisms which integrate them.  The course also includes considerations of nutrient absorption and delivery, metabolism, excretory function, and acid-base balance.  This course has both a lecture and laboratory component.  This course and BIOL 2210 provide students with a general introduction to the biology of the human body.

BIOL 2700 Microbiology (with lab) (AA) (AS-E) (TM)
This course is offered on Main Campus.
6 contact hours: 3 lecture, 3 lab (outline)
Prerequisite: BIOL 1520 or BIOL 2210 or admission to the Biotechnology Science program. This course, designed for allied health and biotechnology science students, introduces the study of microorganisms and their impact on human health.  It focuses on the interactions between human hosts and microbes as well as microbial cell organization, patterns of growth and metabolism, and identifications of medically important microbes.  Topics include bacterial cell structure and function; bacterial growth and reproduction; physical and chemical control methods of microbes; relevant characteristics of medically important bacteria; general characteristics of fungi, protozoa, and viruses, and human diseases caused by these microbes; disease transmission; microbial pathogenesis; host defense mechanisms; antimicrobial drugs; and microbial drug resistance.  This course has both a lecture and a laboratory component.

*The Holden University Center is directly across Route 306 from Main Campus.
Shuttle buses run continuously between Main Campus and the Holden University Center when classes are in session.

(AA) This course is an option to meet the Natural Sciences requirement for Lakeland’s Associate of Arts Degree.

(AS) This course is an option to meet the Natural Sciences requirement for Lakeland’s Associate of Science Degree.  Both parts of the course (I and II) are required.

(AS-E) This course is an option to meet the Natural Sciences elective requirement for Lakeland’s Associate of Science Degree.

(TM) This course is included in Lakeland’s Transfer Module.  In most instances, this course will transfer to other University System of Ohio colleges and universities as a science course.  Be sure to speak with your Lakeland academic advisor AND an advisor for your transfer college to confirm the course status, BEFORE enrolling in this course.
General transfer information may be available at http://www.transfer.org.

The following natural science courses are also available to AA and AS students:
CHEMISTRY: CHEM 1050, 1100, 1150, 1500, 1600, 2000, 2500, 2600
GEOGRAPHY: GEOG 1550
GEOLOGY: GEOL 1100, 1200
PHYSICS: PHYS 1500, 1550, (PHYS 1610 or PHYS 2410), (PHYS 1620 or PHYS 2420)
PHYSICAL SCIENCE: PSCI 1100, 1300, 1400
Please speak with your Academic Advisor(s) about the area of science which is most complementary to your intended career and interests.


Full Time Faculty

Full time members of the Lakeland Biology Department are a diverse faculty with areas of expertise in botany, zoology, vertebrate biology, forest science, ecology, anatomy-physiology, microbiology, molecular biology, exercise science, medicine, and neuroscience.  Five members of the department hold doctoral degrees (four Ph.D.s, one of which also holds an M.D, and one D.A.) and two members hold a Master of Science degree (while completing a Ph.D.).  Teaching experience ranges from more than 20 years of full time teaching to recent graduates.  Department members maintain a strong commitment to educational quality and have received multiple Excellence in Teaching nominations and awards.


Part-Time Faculty

Our part-time instructors are valued members of the department.  Some have been teaching with us for over 15 years and several have received Excellence in Teaching nominations and awards.

All part-time faculty are required to have a minimum of a Master’s Degree in Biology or a related field.  Lakeland Community College’s part-time biology faculty are expected to collaborate with the full time faculty.  Our part-time faculty members have included doctors, registered nurses, veterinarians, clinical researchers, toxicologists, naturalists, and retired high school teachers.  Biology course sections are offered according to the needs of the department.  Each part-time instructor’s expertise and work experience is matched to the available course sections.

Part-time faculty are expected to be comfortable using technology in the classroom.  Such technology may include editing and creating presentations and displaying relative videos, animations, and slides.  Communication via email is routine and expected at Lakeland for both students and faculty.  Additionally, the Blackboard Learn platform is an integral part of the instructional model at Lakeland (Blackboard training is provided.)

To apply, submit your application through Lakeland’s Human Resources Department.

To aid the hiring process be sure that your application packet includes an up-to-date Curriculum Vita and a cover letter with the following information:

  • Your current, preferred, phone number and an email address that you check regularly.
  • A list of Lakeland’s courses in which you are interested in teaching.
  • Days and times that you can (or cannot teach).  If our Madison location is convenient for you, be sure to let us know.
  • A list of courses and dates which you have taught at other institutions.  Additional helpful information includes the textbook and any supporting online or electronic study materials used for the course.  Please keep these details to a concise list.

Please note:
Lakeland does NOT hire remote faculty.  We will NOT respond to inquiries about teaching online courses.
All applicants are subject to Lakeland’s nepotism policy and a criminal history background check.

Opportunity Starts Here
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